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. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and governor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rights, the struggle of the middle class, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. >> announcer: from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television show, this is "meet the press." >> good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous "i have a dream" spe
.c. should be the 51st state of the united states of america. statehood for 600,000 residents . finally, let it go forth that this is not only a commemoration, a continuation, but what you have here are two generations that have come together. there's a lot said about the joshua generation, the younger people. but i remind them it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side by side together and so let this be a day in which moses points the way for joshua and the walls of segregation, of racism, materialism come tumbling down. with that, let me introduce our first speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy, committee of the national egislation, dr. michael chang. the day after king died, robert kennedy spoke on the mindless men as of violence. here is what he said. what has violence accomplished? what has it created? we tolerate a rising level of violence. we flor if i killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire weapons. we honor swagger and wielders of force. we excuse those who are willing to
of america. residents.or 600,000 forth thatt it go this is not only a commemoration of continuation. but what you have here are two generations that have come together and there is a lot said about the joshua generation. the younger people. them, it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side-by-side together and so let this be a date in which moses points the way for joshua the walls of segregation of racism and materialism come tumbling down. our that, let me introduce irst speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy friends committee, a national legislation, dr. michael shank. >> the day after martin luther king died, robert kennedy spoke on violence. here is what he said, what has violence accomplished and created? we tolerate a rising level of violence that ignores our common humanity. we glorify killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire at weapons. we honor the wielders of force. we excuse those willing to build their lives on the shattered dreams of other. there is another violence just a
, but that is a dangerous belief, said the president. dr. king called america the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. he was right. and still is today. when profit motive and property rights are considered more important than people, he said, militarism is incapable of being conquered. a true revolution of values will look and easily on the glaring contrast to party and well. thise revelation will say way of settling differences is not just. american can lead the way in the revolution of values. no document can make these humans any less of our brothers. the true meaning of compassion and non-parlance is when it helps us to see the enemies point of view. there is nothing to prevent us from re- ordering our priorities. the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. let us practice what they -- >> ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the national but justice coalition -- of the national black justice coalition. >> one of my mentors told me in order to truly be free, you must give to causes greater than yourself. every day, and educate, allocate, and celebrate the lot
their government for redress, and to awaken america's long-slumbering conscience. we rightly and best remember dr. king's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. his words belong to the ages possessing a power and prophesy unmatched in our time. but we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose named never appeared in the history books, never got on tv. many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters. they lived in towns where they couldn't vote and cities where their votes didn't matter. there were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. they had seen loved ones beaten and children fire hosed, and they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. and yet they chose a different path. in the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormenters. in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonv
to work. how would dr. king see the current racial situation in america? >> it took guts to do that then. and it's going to take guts to finish the job now. >> it is the collapse of the traditional family that is wreaking havoc in the african-american community. >> i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps. >> the other issue is racial profile acvoter identification requirements. while somewhat important are essentially a sideshow, a sideshow. a sideshow. >> stand tall in your community. fight for diversity. understand its strength. >> sideshow. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out. and get in the way! make some noise! >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that the men are made to live together as brothers. >> sideshow. if dr. king were alive today, i believe he would be brokenhearted about what has happened to the traditional famil family. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching "the ed show" right here 5:00 monday through friday. chris matthews is at 7:00. stick around to watch his show. bi
changed america. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prove if i unmatched in our time. >> i have a dream. >> they opened minds. they melted hearts. >> we must keep the faith and keep our eyes on the prize. >> that was the spirit of young people like john lewis brought to that day. >> and america is that promised land for all of us. >> in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in. >> because they kept marching. america changed. >> and yes, eventually the white house changed. >> free at last, free at last. thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching. i'm ed schultz. "the ed show." we're here monday through friday 5:00 eastern. today was a big day of emotion for this country. a day of record, a day of reflection. to me, you know what, i am so feeling so good about inside is because i think today was a day of learning for a lot of americans. there are a lot of american who's weren't alive 50 years ago today that kind of wondered what this was all about. and the neat thing about it all is that you can't change the f
coverage of what is happening in the world as well as what is happening in america. from here is a call next alabama. welcome. walter, are you there? you're on the air. i had a brother served in vietnam. realize like going into a rack them of the women, and putting our boys over there and women and the people here were calling in criticizing. if they would take a gun and do something like that, it is different. if it were not for our armed forces, we would be controlled by other countries. just like in the united states, these folk who rob banks or stuff and this that going on all the time. ain't none of us perfect, but i think our soldiers are doing a good job. media,o you think the the usb then, does a good job of covering our efforts in afghanistan and before that to my iraq? host: i sure do. i sure do.ler: host: go ahead. i am a former korean, vietnam veteran, and to make -- to me, the meeting is you have two efferent sides of the story from different angles. i tend to go to the foreign media to see what they think of us. at the same time, i think the lady talked about looking at wh
, d.c. to share my thoughts on what i think we need to focus on in public education in america. >> thank you. thank you, joe. >> i am a product of forced busing for racial equality. i take you back to the '70s, where diversity was a word that was foreign to america, but it was the future. i take you to birmingham, alabama, last night, where i did a radio town hall and i can tell you what's happening in america right now. the dream can only be realized if we pay attention to what's going on in our own backyard. when we start picking and choosing neighborhoods, who's going to get the resources and who's not going to get the resources, we will lose this country, we will lose the vision of diversity, we will lose the opportunity of equality to move all people forward. you need to pay attention to what's happening in your backyard to make sure that your school and those young kids get the resources they need to have an opportunity in america that will help them grow. being a product of the middle class, i was the one that was afforded the opportunities. and if we start picking and c
've heard this kind of talk before. but america is a different country. voters are rejecting 40 years of gop scare tactics. voters are supporting the obama administration's move to end severe mandatory sentences for low-level nonviolent drug offenders. of course, over at fox, they don't get it. >> they're not pot smokers. they're not pill poppers. >> wait a second. 50%. but the thing, what if the kid has a drug problem? >> then you get the kid to rehab or lock him in the basement or do what you have to do. that's what parents do. >> who thinks that one of these elderly people who have been in prison for a mandatory minimum sentence, that they're going to get out and they're not going to be on public assistance? of course they are. >> so we should keep people in prison to keep them off public aid? we should just lock up people with drug problems. this kind of demonizing and fearmongering is really nothing new for the right. it goes all the way back to president richard nixon. >> america's public enemy number one in the united states is drug abuse. in order to fight and defeat this enemy, it i
, and are responsible, here in america, you can make it if you try. >>> even as this pecks increasingly crucial to get into the middle class, the cost of a college education is going further and further out of reach. with the average student borrower graduating more than $26,000 in dead. at the university of buffalo today, the president said that has to change. >> higher education is still the best ticket to upward mobility. if we don't do something about keeping it within reach, it will create problems for economic mobility for generations to come. that's not acceptable. >>> to help make that change hahn happen, the president is propose a plan to tie federal aid to the schools offering, using a variety of metrics to reward the schools helping students from all -- if enacted it would be the biggest change since 1965. but as the president noted, that could be a big if. >> we've seen a faction of republicans in congress that suggest that maybe america shouldn't pay its bills that have already been run up, that we should shut down government if they can't shut down obamacare. we can't afford in washingto
to what is. >>> the following limited commercial presentation is made possible by bank of america. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
states of america. oh, really, watch this. >> we recognize that change takes time. and that a process like this is never guaranteed. there are examples in recent history of countries that are transitioned out of a military government towards a democratic government and did not always go in a straight line and the process was not always smooth. there are going to be false starts. there will be difficult days. america's democratic journey took us through mighty struggles to perfect our union. >> a few short moments after makes those quite ignorant remarks, guess where the commander in chief was spotted. after that, he was playing golf on the golf course. which leaves me with one simple question. is he really that out of touch or does he simply not care? here to help answer the question, patrick j. buchanan, fox news analyst, juan williams. patrick j. buchanan, precipitated this. now he was lecturing the military which is getting rid of the radical islamist. is this the foreign policy that america needs? >> i think the things are out of control in cairo as far as the president is concern
and syria, america has to take a much more clever role. >> we'll get the latest from the white house. but that is not the only pressure on the president. >> i think now is the single best time to stop obama care. >> stop talking about impeachment. let's have a legitimate debate. let's fight his policies. let's try to appeal obama care. >> gop leaders are split on the push for impeachment as the opposition to defund obama care continues in earnest. >>> and later -- >> if a church is off limits, if the sanctuary of god is not off limits, if people are so malice and mean-spirited, what has become of our nation. >> retracing the steps of the civil rights movement, and confronting some of the ghosts which still haunt the city of birmingham today. we'll get to those stories in just a moment. >>> we start, though, with that developing news in syria at this hour. new information from washington, and the international community. allegations about the chemical weapons attack by the assad regime. i'm joined by nbc's ayman mohieldin. and kirsten at the white house. >> reporter: they've reached a
stands for every servant that serves america. the butler is you, you're serving america. the butler is me, i'm serving america through my cinema. and he happens to be looked down on. that's how we look at -- how we look at class, how we address class in america. which transcends race too. >> and you'll see martin bashir's full interview with lee daniels director of the butler" coming up in a few minutes. next the day's top lines. look who has a new appreciation for the performing arts. >> this is an artist. a very brave artist, believe it or not, rodeo clowns. they could he get mauled by a bull at any time. this is art, this is entertainment. a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar mayer. [ male
elected. i wanted to do health care. >> here in america, in the wealthiest nation on earth, no illness or accident should lead to any family's financial ruin. >> you need to pay attention to what's happening in your backyard. >> defund obama care. >> defund obama care sue repeal obama care. ♪ ♪ i want it now, i want it all >> i wanted to do health care because i knew it could change the country and i knew it could help people. >> we see this coming. just like the tie tannic. >> on the ship we're going to die. >> are you saying that society should let him die? >> no. >> there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. all right? there are 47% who are with him who are -- who believe that they are victims. >> that's who the republicans are. we shouldn't be talking about infrastructure investment, investment in education, investment in workers and going round two on health care. >> i want to repeal the law of the land. is that clear. >> we will not back down from that fight. >> i've been very proud to do that. ♪ >> let's go. let's hit the road. >> good to h
, america, wake up. we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way. make some noise! >> much grief as we give congress, it's amazing that it is john lewis is still a member of the institution. lonny bunch founder of the national museum of african-american history and culture which will be completed in 2015 on the national mall in washington. pulitzer prize winning taylor branch, the author of the landmark history of the civil rights movement, america in the king years. his most recent book, the king years, is now available in paperback and i assume download as well. we say paperback. in these days, can you get it on the download itself. let me start with you, you're in the middle of trying to build a museum appropriate for the african-american legacy, the importance of the march on washington. an entire wing? how important is it in the legacy as you're building this? >> the march on washington is one of the key moments in african-american history, in american history. so our go
in oprahhoma. >> we are trying to ignite that love affair that america has with america'sfounding. >> the founding fathers of america sure had -- >> reshape the united states into a progressive liberal utopia. >> for you and for me. everybody. equality, peace. >> oh, no, let's go. let's go crazy. >> let's get done. >> good to have you with us tonight, folks. have you ever been in a conversation with a conservative who comes back in any argument you may be having and says, you know what? there are absolutes. tonight's ed show is about absolutes. absolutely change taking place right here in the middle of the country surrounded by red states. tonight i'm broadcasting from minneapolis, minnesota, in the middle of the country where democrats have taken control of the house, senate and governor's office. you know, in the past year we have seen three things, fiscal change, social change and something that we never see anything under republican rule, and that's reinvestment in public education. this state is proof positive when the democrats get control, things change for the be
to a broad swath of america. dr. king's speech was a pointed speech, but a healing speech. dr. king's speech was an important speech, because it charted a vision. i think for the president, and for all of us that are going to participate in after the the activities, we call it a continuation, not just a commemorative series of events, for all of us and for the president i think especially it is about the future. it's about 21st century america, but it's also about a recognition of what i call sinister forces, martin, that are at play in this nation, the discussion about repealing health care, the voter suppression laws that exist, all of this in the face of a great recession in the aftermath of a great recession, when what the nation should really be about is building the kind of bridges we need to build economic prosperity for all. it's important, but it also is a chance action i think, for the president to think beyond his administration, and think beyond his term as president, to set a course which may last for decades to come. >> professor peterson, mark moriel talks about the future, bu
into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we will bring you the live coverage of the events here on the mall throughout the day, right here on msnbc. and as we get things started this hour, i am thrilled to be joined this morning by joy reid, msnbc contributor and managing editor of thegrio.com. she also leads nerdland whenever i'm on vacation. also, julian vaughn, naacp chairman emeritus. and next to him, the reverend william barber, head of the north carolina chapter of the naacp and leader of one of today's most important social movements for justice, the moral mondays protes
's the beginning. it's the beginning of a great moral crusade. to allow america do the unfinished work of american democracy. the congress has to act. >> by the forces of our demands, our determination and our numbers, we shall splitter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. >> we must say wake up, america, wake up, for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> bob dylan played his new song, only a pawn in their game, about the murder of metger evers. peter paul and mary all he formed. and then there was dr. martin luther king. spurred on by mahalia jackson who said, tell them about the dream. will be remembered as one of the most brilliant and important speeches in american history. >> let it ring. from every state and every city. we will be able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men and white men, pros stents and catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old negro spiritual, free at last, free at last, thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> joining me now, congresswoman
of "collision 2012, obama versus romney" and the future of electi elections in america. thank you for coming here, dan. >> thank you, and dree ya. >> and the fact that you got so many people to speak to you so openly, and going back over the contours of the campaign and the first question is, why was 2012 so different than past campaigns? >> well, for two reasons. one, this was a big moment in american politics, and 2008 election was historic for all of the reasons that we know, but this race was more important and telling about where we are in the politics. i called it "collision 2012" because it was a collision between the america of 2008 that e lekted barack obama and the america of 2010 that swept the republicans into power, and it was a collision of philosophies that were enunciated by governor romney and president obama. and in the end, what it told us about the country is that we are deeply divided and that the election in itself did not resolve many of the questions that were at the center of the debate. >> and do you think that the defining characteristic of this campaign was the ph
. george bush ruined america's credibility when it comes 0 intervention and this is part of the problem that president obama has. he can't go out and get a coalition of the willing so easily anymore because of this country's record of lying to the world, of misstepping, of creating refugees. how do we know this is going to be the right thing to do just because on paper it says it's the moral thing to do? i don't buy it. i haven't seen enough. and i hope it doesn't happen. get your cell phones out. for tonight's question, i ask, the audience again, should the united states take military action against syria ria? >> a for yes, b for no to 67622. you can go to our blog at ed.msnbc.com. we'll bring you the results later in the show. i have two exberts on this tonight. this is where america comes to talk, "the ed show." former navy admiral who worked in intelligence, former pennsylvania ef congressman joe ses stack with us and john gar mandy. this is the most we have heard everywhere secretary of state kerry, the most from president obama. today is a big news day. congressman, you first. 78%
, and will be replaced by al jazeera america. in our time here in "the war room" we have focused on important political stories from our march goes on series, to controlling the playing of gun violence in this country and the immigration reform debate that continues to rage on. joining me now inside "the war room" are two of my current colleagues and friends, john fugelsang, the host of "viewpoint, who has the second best hair on this network, and my very close friend, "the young turks" studio in los angeles cenk uygur. thank you both for joining us in "the war room" one last time. >> thank you, michael. >> thank you. >> michael: john, i'm sgoorth with you what do you think the impact that current tv has had on the progressive discussion if any at all? >> well, that's a good question. i have to say it was positive, if not necessarily profound. while this whole experience has proven that liberals are very good at capitalism, i'm very happy for mr. gore, i don't think network had the chance to make the proper impact it could have had had it had proper promotions behind it. i think if we would have had a
now in america, are people judged not by the color of their skin but the content of their character. 54% of all adults agreed with that statement but just 19% of african-americans. why do you suppose there's so much pessimism on the part of black americans whether or not they're being judged by the content of their character. >> it's not because black americans are naturally pessimistic. it's because they live life in this country and see what happens to themselves, to their children, they see their chances to move up the economic ladder stunted. they see their inbought to dolt better for themselves, their children, their grandchildren and see things not working out as well as they can. things were better than 50 years ago. there are loss in this country that prohibit me from being the victim of discrimination. but that doesn't mean that life is wonderful and everything is free. it means we've still got a lot of work to do and feed to have everybody put his and her shoulders to the wheel and make sure that work is done. we had a great movement in 1963 when this march happened. we ne
the middle east, impacts the united states of america. talk about the recent developments and especially what happened yesterday and historically just how bad that is, not only for egypt but the middle east and stability across the region? >> well, you put your finger on it. we've often, you know, for 30 years, 40 years even, we've valued a stable egypt in the shifting calculus of the middle east as arguably the greatest value that explains going back, you know, at least to the late '80s, early '90s, a support for the mubarak regime which was hardly a model of human rights and democracy, to say the least. so we have practiced a real policy there, a balance of interests, and now because of the arab spring, because of what's happened in this remarkable scenes from the square over the past couple of years, we have this question of, if you have a democratically elected government, a, what does that mean? and b, what if you get a democratically elected government that you believe is ultimately bad for the security of the region, which is our national interests in this? >> unfortunately, jon, there
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america to participate in this commemoration. >> i am going to defer to melissa on this one. your daughter is here. what does it mean? >> it means everything. my father and his twin brother were here 21 years old and stood here 50 years ago. i talked to my father and uncle yesterday and the first question they said to me is will your daughter be there? her being here allows a completion of enter generational pathway of struggle and i talked about it on msnbc before, that i was raised with the belief, a simple belief, that the struggle continues, that you do not have all the answers, you are picking up the struggle from before and passing it forward. >> i think we're at a unique time in history because we have a black president who wants to connect and has connected continually with young people and as we move from this march, i have always been one in the news business to say what does this mean? where do we go from here? president obama now is positioned to pick up the torch and carry what martin luther king advocated for and believed in and fought for, and because now we really have a ne
be if but when. >> is america about to strike? >> officials here at the pentagoning are operating as if this is in fact a done deal. >> if you were to come, you're ready to go like that. >> like that. >> with small strikes. >> four u.s. navy destroyers and two submarines. >> the crisis has outpaced the world's response. >> what we saw in syria should shock the conscience of the world. >> we are supposed to be outraged by anyone using chemical weapons. >> they're trying to come up with an objective that punishes assad. >> if the syrians had oil, we would have been in there. >> how do we reconcile not wanting to get into this war. >> these people don't want american troops and for this to become another iraq. >> smash ath face of bashir assad. >> the president continues to work with his national security team when he has made a decision and has announcement to make, he'll make it. >> we begin with mounting signs is of impending u.s. military action against syria with senior officials telling nbc news strikes could be launched as soon as thursday. secretary of state john kerry ratche
to the ea complete. there are on the national mall our president whose story reflects the promise of america will help us honor the man who inspired millions to redeem that promise. president bush refers to the promise of america that is reflected in president obama. when we think about that, how significant does that weigh on this presidency that basically barack obama really personifies, comes to life as the dream of mlk? >> good for george w. bush. i thought it was a nice statement. i'm not going to question that. but to say this. at least back in 1939 when marion anderson had to sing here, "my country 'tis of thee" rather than the constitution hall they said the reason because she was black. at least they were honest back then. today in american politics you have donald trump who hangs around with mitt romney talking about the president being an illegal immigrant. you have people talking about nullification of the law of the land. you got people talking impeachment like coburn and ted cruz out there. they never say their problem with obama is that he is black but look at the pattern. the
alone america. obama, call him a liberal or what you want but he was not on the fringe. he was down the plate of the democratic party. you have guys who are both not ready and also taking really wacko bird positions to -- >> at the same time, a lot of that has to do with the fact where you live and what your views are. there are a lot of people in middle america that don't see ted cruz or rand paul or marco rubio out of the mainstream. a lot of people. as many people don't think they are, as people don't think barack obama is. i mean barack obama -- >> they're not even in the mainstream of the republican party. barack obama was in the mainstream of the democratic party. he may have been inexperienced. >> when these guys came in 2010 they are in the mainstream of the republican party. look at the fact that in 2010 it's not like there were a couple people that snuck. >> office. republicans won the largest legislative landslide on the state and national level i think probably in the 20 -- in a century. it was a remarkable victory for them. the problem that some of them don't understand
chambers again. and the united states of america doing absolutely nothing about it this time. if nixon trusted anyone, he trusted henry kissinger, which was as stupid a calculation as he ever made. kissinger was as un-trustworthy a person who ever worked in government. they tell the final mistake nixon made with henry kissinger. it was the night before he announced his resignation, he spent time with him. when kissinger returned to his office, the phone rang. it was the president. lawrence egleburger picked up the extension to listen. that was the custom. eagleburger was shocked. the president was slurring his words. he was drunk, out of control. eagleburger could barely make out what he said. he felt ill and hung up. the president had one last request, henry, please don't ever tell anyone that i cried and that i was not strong. there is the drunk president of the united states begging henry kissinger not to tell anyone on a phone line, where kissinger always made sure he was already telling someone else, because someone else was always listening. and then kissinger, and eagleburger ma
throughout america. any police jurisdiction. you have to do it. officers have to have the right of inquiry. if they see some suspicious behavior. >> so, jackie, new york city michael bloomberg is blasting the judge's decision and the city is appealing. how do you see this play out >> hard to say. it's a very polar wrizing issue. one thing that is clear this will extend beyond mayor bloomberg's tenure. you heard some say things need to change. there's only one that said they want to abolish it completely. but christine came out on friday saying the city council won't do anything to fight this judge's opinion. so it seems like reform is coming, but we just don't know what it will look like. >> jim, another angle here because the president of the naacp, ben jealous reacting on "meet the press." here's that. >> we're now at a point where you have more stop-and-frisk of young black men in new york city than there are young black and men in new york city. that's why charles blow said and while the judge quoted him in saying it's like burning down the house to rid it of mice. >> so what do you ma
a to b. we still, though, are the greatest country in the world and what america thinks and does is important. i know that people there are watching our actions, i don't think that we should be anything more than a strong sense of come coming any less than a strong sense of calm. but our leverage is different. and yet at the same time, the leverage that we have, we should use. people still care, we're working with saudi arabia and the emirates right now on issues in syria. so the things we end up having effects more than just the aid. there's no question the monetary part of this is minuscule compared to what's being supplanted by these other countries. but we still have influence. we need to use it as much as we can. but we cannot wave a magic wand and i think sometimes people react in ways that just are not thoughtful when people do things that are counter to what we think as good policy in these countries. certainly we should react and we should react in a measured way. and we don't have all the cards and i know it's frustrating to americans, but we need to be patient, we need
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